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Next to complaints relating to law enforcement, the concern for schools and education generates the greatest demand for the attention of human relations commissions. Because school decision making is diffused between boards of education, school administrators, and faculties human rights commissions are usually not able to establish strong working relationships with the education community and special strategies need to be developed.

Outstanding resources and model programs are available that cover just about every facet of education that would be of concern to a commission. Commissions may form education committees to examine specific needs, identify resources and programs, and develop strategies.

WHAT CAN WE LEARN FROM THE CAMPUS FREE SPEECH DEBATES?

By | May 17th, 2019|Education, Intergroup Relations|

In late March Amherst College’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion—hoping to spark discussion over how students discuss matters such as “identity, privilege, oppression, and inclusion”—released a guide to its student body called the “Common Language Guide.” The email containing the report explained how “This project emerged out of a need to come to a common

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‘It’s Like the Wild West’: Sexual Assault Victims Struggle in K-12 Schools

By | May 16th, 2019|Education|

WINCHESTER, Va. — Nausea had consumed her as her attacker pinned her arms down at a park, forced her first kiss upon her, and tried to take off her pants at the tender age of 14, and nausea resurfaced every time she saw him in the hallways of her high school.

For a year, the girl

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‘Threatening the Future’: The High Stakes of Deepening School Segregation

By | May 16th, 2019|Education|

The 65th anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education approaches on May 17, but fights over school segregation, rather than decreasing, are becoming more common. Cities like New York and San Francisco are debating how to assign students to schools in ways that foster classroom diversity, and school secession movements — in which parents seek

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How Colleges Use 6-Word Stories About Race as a Teaching Tool

By | May 10th, 2019|Education, Intergroup Relations|

When librarians at Wayne State University learned about the Race Card Project, Kristen Chinery, a reference archivist at its Walter P. Reuther Library, was excited.

As chair of the Wayne State libraries’ diversity and inclusion council, Chinery thought that participating in the project, which collects people’s six-word submissions about their experience or observations of race,

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San Francisco Had an Ambitious Plan to Tackle School Segregation. It Made It Worse.

By | April 29th, 2019|Education|

SAN FRANCISCO — Like many parents in San Francisco, Melvin Canas and Delfina Ramirez described applying to public kindergarten as a part-time job. They researched schools all over the city for their daughter, Cinthya; took unpaid hours off their jobs as cooks to tour over a dozen; and ultimately ranked 15 of them

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Report: No ‘Crisis’ in Free Speech

By | April 3rd, 2019|Education, Intergroup Relations|

A spike in campus activism — some of it directed against speakers whose views offend — has complicated free speech, says a new report. But the landscape is far from disastrous, as politicians, particularly in the Trump administration, depict it.

The 100-page compendium “Chasm in the Classroom: Campus Free Speech in a Divided

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50 Years of Affirmative Action: What Went Right, and What It Got Wrong

By | April 2nd, 2019|Education, Intergroup Relations|

On cold mornings, Les Goodson shows up early outside the University Club, on a wealthy stretch of Fifth Avenue in Manhattan, and races two panhandlers he has nicknamed Catman and Pimp-the-Baby for a warm spot in front of a steam vent. He launches into “Take Five” on his saxophone, leaving his case open

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SCHOOLS THAT EMPHASIZE DIVERSITY PRODUCE HEALTHIER STUDENTS

By | March 12th, 2019|Education, Intergroup Relations|

It is well-known that African Americans suffer from higher rates of heart diseasethan their fellow citizens. There is significant, if not conclusive, evidence that racism-driven stress is a likely factor.

Hopeful new research suggests schools can help prevent, or at least delay, the onset of this

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Dilemma for Methodist Colleges

By | March 11th, 2019|Education, LGBTQ+|

When delegates to the General Conference of the United Methodist Church voted late last month to strengthen the church’s prohibitions on performing same-sex marriages and ordaining gay and lesbian clergy, it was over the opposition of Methodist colleges and universities in the U.S.

The presidents of a group of 93 colleges and universities affiliated with the

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