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Next to complaints relating to law enforcement, the concern for schools and education generates the greatest demand for the attention of human relations commissions. Because school decision making is diffused between boards of education, school administrators, and faculties human rights commissions are usually not able to establish strong working relationships with the education community and special strategies need to be developed.

Outstanding resources and model programs are available that cover just about every facet of education that would be of concern to a commission. Commissions may form education committees to examine specific needs, identify resources and programs, and develop strategies.

50 Years of Affirmative Action: What Went Right, and What It Got Wrong

By | April 2nd, 2019|Education, Intergroup Relations|

On cold mornings, Les Goodson shows up early outside the University Club, on a wealthy stretch of Fifth Avenue in Manhattan, and races two panhandlers he has nicknamed Catman and Pimp-the-Baby for a warm spot in front of a steam vent. He launches into “Take Five” on his saxophone, leaving his case open

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SCHOOLS THAT EMPHASIZE DIVERSITY PRODUCE HEALTHIER STUDENTS

By | March 12th, 2019|Education, Intergroup Relations|

It is well-known that African Americans suffer from higher rates of heart diseasethan their fellow citizens. There is significant, if not conclusive, evidence that racism-driven stress is a likely factor.

Hopeful new research suggests schools can help prevent, or at least delay, the onset of this

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Dilemma for Methodist Colleges

By | March 11th, 2019|Education, LGBTQ+|

When delegates to the General Conference of the United Methodist Church voted late last month to strengthen the church’s prohibitions on performing same-sex marriages and ordaining gay and lesbian clergy, it was over the opposition of Methodist colleges and universities in the U.S.

The presidents of a group of 93 colleges and universities affiliated with the

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What Poor Kids Want Rich Colleges to Know About Their Experiences

By | March 8th, 2019|Education|

When Zuri Gordon received several thick envelopes in the mail saying she got into highly-selective colleges, she hoped her family would be thrilled. But that’s not how it played out.

“My mother would not care—she would say, ‘You’re not going to go there, we can’t afford that,’” Gordon told an audience at SXSW EDU this week,

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Equal Protection for Trans Students

By | March 7th, 2019|Education, LGBTQ+|

As presidents of two public community colleges, serving a combined 82,000 students in Maryland and Pennsylvania, we are concerned about news that the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is drafting policies that eliminate the concept of transgender persons.

It is easy to imagine how transgender students could face circumstances that require

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What Faculty Members Think

By | March 5th, 2019|Education, Intergroup Relations|

Discrimination is a source of stress for many faculty members, especially women and ethnic minorities. And most professors say they’re not prepared to deal with diversity-related conflict in their own classrooms. So finds a new report from the Higher Education Research Institute at the University of California, Los Angeles.

The institute publishes its

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The ‘Bamboo Ceiling’ and the Future of Affirmative Action

By | March 4th, 2019|Education, Employment & Housing, Intergroup Relations|

For months now, the lawsuit against Harvard University over its admissions practices has focused on the idea that affirmative action may be limiting opportunities for Asian Americans. Remove consideration of race, the plaintiffs argue, and Asian Americans will prosper.

New research, not focused on Harvard’s practices, offers a different perspective on that idea.

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Why White School Districts Have So Much More Money

By | February 26th, 2019|Education, Intergroup Relations|

In 1954, the Supreme Court ruled in Brown v. Board of Education that segregated public schools are unconstitutional.

In 2018, on the 64th anniversary of that ruling, a lawsuit filed in New Jersey claimed that state’s schools are some of the most segregated in the nation. That’s because, the lawsuit alleged, New Jersey school district

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Surrounded: Killings near school, and the students left behind

By | February 26th, 2019|Education, Intergroup Relations, Police & Community|

Even as crime has dropped in L.A. over the last two decades, there are thousands of children who grow up with a constant drumbeat of death while navigating safe paths to schools in neighborhoods where someone has been killed nearby.

The impact of close-up violence can be devastating and costly for students, schools and communities: Some

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Debunking 3 myths about black students — using data and logic

By | February 26th, 2019|Education|

Ivory A. Toldson, a professor of counseling psychology at Howard University, has a new book with a mouthful of a title but an important message: “NO BS (Bad Stats): Black People Need People Who Believe in Black People Enough Not to Believe Every Bad Thing They Hear About BLACK PEOPLE.”

The book, as

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