Education

/Education

Next to complaints relating to law enforcement, the concern for schools and education generates the greatest demand for the attention of human relations commissions. Because school decision making is diffused between boards of education, school administrators, and faculties human rights commissions are usually not able to establish strong working relationships with the education community and special strategies need to be developed.

Outstanding resources and model programs are available that cover just about every facet of education that would be of concern to a commission. Commissions may form education committees to examine specific needs, identify resources and programs, and develop strategies.

The ‘Bamboo Ceiling’ and the Future of Affirmative Action

By | March 4th, 2019|Education, Employment & Housing, Intergroup Relations|

For months now, the lawsuit against Harvard University over its admissions practices has focused on the idea that affirmative action may be limiting opportunities for Asian Americans. Remove consideration of race, the plaintiffs argue, and Asian Americans will prosper.

New research, not focused on Harvard’s practices, offers a different perspective on that idea.

Comments Off on The ‘Bamboo Ceiling’ and the Future of Affirmative Action

Why White School Districts Have So Much More Money

By | February 26th, 2019|Education, Intergroup Relations|

In 1954, the Supreme Court ruled in Brown v. Board of Education that segregated public schools are unconstitutional.

In 2018, on the 64th anniversary of that ruling, a lawsuit filed in New Jersey claimed that state’s schools are some of the most segregated in the nation. That’s because, the lawsuit alleged, New Jersey school district

Comments Off on Why White School Districts Have So Much More Money

Surrounded: Killings near school, and the students left behind

By | February 26th, 2019|Education, Intergroup Relations, Police & Community|

Even as crime has dropped in L.A. over the last two decades, there are thousands of children who grow up with a constant drumbeat of death while navigating safe paths to schools in neighborhoods where someone has been killed nearby.

The impact of close-up violence can be devastating and costly for students, schools and communities: Some

Comments Off on Surrounded: Killings near school, and the students left behind

Debunking 3 myths about black students — using data and logic

By | February 26th, 2019|Education|

Ivory A. Toldson, a professor of counseling psychology at Howard University, has a new book with a mouthful of a title but an important message: “NO BS (Bad Stats): Black People Need People Who Believe in Black People Enough Not to Believe Every Bad Thing They Hear About BLACK PEOPLE.”

The book, as

Comments Off on Debunking 3 myths about black students — using data and logic

‘Should White Boys Still Be Allowed to Talk?’

By | February 18th, 2019|Education, Intergroup Relations|

Leda Fisher didn’t waste any time getting to the point in her recent essay in The Dickinsonian. The title was”Should White Boys Still Be Allowed to Talk?”

“When you ask a question at a lecture, is it secretly just your opinion ending with the phrase ‘do you agree?'” asked Fisher, a senior at

Comments Off on ‘Should White Boys Still Be Allowed to Talk?’

After Black Student Is Kept Out of Class Discussion, NYU School Acknowledges ‘Institutional Racism’

By | February 15th, 2019|Education, Intergroup Relations|

While traveling abroad this week, a black graduate student at New York University says he was told by a classmate that a class discussion was easier to facilitate without a “black presence” in the room. Now administrators at NYU’s Silver School of Social Work have acknowledged that it has a problem with “ongoing institutional racism,”

Comments Off on After Black Student Is Kept Out of Class Discussion, NYU School Acknowledges ‘Institutional Racism’

Nearly Half of Undergraduates Are Students of Color. But Black Students Lag Behind.

By | February 14th, 2019|Education, Intergroup Relations|

The key data points in the American Council on Education’s new report on race and ethnicity in higher education come as no surprise: College-student populations are growing more diverse, yet achievement gaps persist among different racial groups.

Still, the poor outcomes for black students in particular are glaring.

All students of color now make up more than

Comments Off on Nearly Half of Undergraduates Are Students of Color. But Black Students Lag Behind.

See Hate Speech, Leave It Up

By | February 11th, 2019|Education, Hate Crimes|

In 2017, student name tags on University of Michigan dormitory doors were vandalized with a racial slur. Black students said then they were being targeted. The incident restarted a vociferous debate on campus prejudices.

If this incident happened today, though, resident assistants and other housing staffers wouldn’t be able to take down the

Comments Off on See Hate Speech, Leave It Up

Lawyers on Race-Conscious Admissions: ‘This is Doable. But Also, Do it Right.’

By | February 1st, 2019|Education, Intergroup Relations|

If part of the intent of the recent affirmative-action lawsuits brought against universities was to send a chill through admissions offices, it doesn’t seem to be working. Most of the discussion at a conference here this week on race and admissions was about how to do a better job bringing underrepresented minority students to campuses,

Comments Off on Lawyers on Race-Conscious Admissions: ‘This is Doable. But Also, Do it Right.’

Underrepresented Students, Unintended Consequences

By | January 28th, 2019|Education|

For the last five years, efforts to assess and “shame” selective colleges based on their enrollment of low-income students have worked — perhaps too well, two top economists of higher education assert in a new paper.

The study, a version of which was published late last week in Education Next, was conducted by

Comments Off on Underrepresented Students, Unintended Consequences