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Next to complaints relating to law enforcement, the concern for schools and education generates the greatest demand for the attention of human relations commissions. Because school decision making is diffused between boards of education, school administrators, and faculties human rights commissions are usually not able to establish strong working relationships with the education community and special strategies need to be developed.

Outstanding resources and model programs are available that cover just about every facet of education that would be of concern to a commission. Commissions may form education committees to examine specific needs, identify resources and programs, and develop strategies.

Even With Affirmative Action, Blacks and Hispanics Are More Underrepresented at Top Colleges Than 35 Years Ago

By | August 25th, 2017|Education|

Even after decades of affirmative action, black and Hispanic students are more underrepresented at the nation’s top colleges and universities than they were 35 years ago, according to a New York Times analysis.

The share of black freshmen at elite schools is virtually unchanged since 1980. Black students are just 6 percent of freshmen but 15

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Outrage Over Op-Ed

By | August 25th, 2017|Education, Intergroup Relations|

Not all cultures are equal.

That’s the assertion made by Amy Wax and Larry Alexander, law professors at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of San Diego, respectively, in a Philadelphia Inquirer opinion piece that also goes on to rail against modern culture, including — but not limited to — “inner-city

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As LA students head back to school, LAUSD has message for immigrants: ‘We stand together’

By | August 15th, 2017|Education, Immigration|

The Los Angeles Unified School District is making visible what it’s so far said in words: that immigrant students and their families are welcome at Los Angeles schools.

When students start the new school year today, they’ll walk through entrances decked with 6-foot-tall banners featuring the Statue of Liberty, long the symbol of new opportunity for

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After dividing California Democrats in 2014, affirmative action resurfaces in the race for governor

By | August 14th, 2017|Education, Intergroup Relations|

A debate about affirmative action has emerged in the campaign for governor, threatening to inject a potentially volatile racial element into the 2018 contest after the issue divided California Democrats along ethnic lines three years ago.

The question of whether race should be considered in admissions to California’s colleges and universities was raised in recent weeks

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An Anti-Hate Group Has This Advice for When the Alt-Right Comes to Campus

By | August 11th, 2017|Education, Intergroup Relations|

For universities, the new academic year has nearly arrived. If it’s anything like last year, controversial speakers will be a consistent challenge for administrators and students alike.

More often than not, the speakers that generate the most controversy are those labeled right-wing reactionaries by their critics. Last fall, Richard Spencer, a white nationalist, launched

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What a Fraternity Hazing Death Revealed About the Painful Search for an Asian-American Identity

By | August 9th, 2017|Education, Intergroup Relations|

When Michael Deng, a college freshman, joined an Asian-American fraternity, he was looking for a sense of belonging and identity. Two months later he was dead.

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Affirmative Action Policies Evolve, Achieving Their Own Diversity

By | August 7th, 2017|Education, Intergroup Relations|

Just a year ago, after the Supreme Court rejected a challenge to the University of Texas at Austin’s admissions program by a single swing vote, the question seemed to be edging, at last, toward an answer: Colleges could, the justices ruled, consider race when deciding whom to let

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Targets of Internet Outrage

By | August 4th, 2017|Education, Intergroup Relations|

Many professors who have expressed their views about race and politics this year have found themselves targets of both the left and right. Nothing is too abstrusely academic, it seems, to seed an attack campaign fueled by websites that surveil social media to find gotcha-worthy gems. The Professor Watch List, for one, created last

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Sometimes, Perceptions of Affirmative Action Don’t Mesh With Reality

By | August 3rd, 2017|Education, Intergroup Relations|

Several refrains marked the election campaign of Donald Trump. “Make America great again.” “Build the wall.” But another phrase commonly uttered by the president continues to animate his base: “The system is rigged.”

This sentiment also underscored some reactions to a recent report from The New York Times, based on a memo it had obtained, which

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Trump May Find No Easy Targets if He Attacks Race in Admissions

By | August 3rd, 2017|Education, Intergroup Relations|

The nation’s long fight over affirmative action at colleges has flared back up with a report this week that the Trump administration’s Justice Department plans to go after race-conscious admissions policies. While colleges have good reason to be concerned about such news, the fears it has aroused in them may be exaggerated and somewhat misplaced.

Why?

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