Employment & Housing

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Generally, human relations commissions are represented on affirmative action committees or have their own committee to address county employment issues. Commissions frequently will monitor county employment policies, procedures and practices to ensure that they are not discriminatory.

As in employment legislation may preempt local governmental agencies from enforcing laws barring discrimination in housing. However, fair housing groups investigate and discover discrimination in housing by sending out “testers” to determine whether people representing those protected by law are treated differently than other applicants for housing. When discrimination is found the group may charge the offending party with discrimination.

Human relations commission often develop working relationships with local fair housing groups.

Commissions may take the lead to ensure that people who move into areas where they are not the dominant racial or ethnic group are welcomed. Programs to accomplish this vary according to the situation. The type of activity appropriate when a relatively large number of people representing an ethnic or racial group move into an area populated with people from a different ethnic or racial group may be inappropriate when a few families of one ethnic or racial group move into a relatively homogeneous community of people from another ethnic or racial group. Programs may involve the residents in isolation from the institutions of the county, or they may involve the schools, law enforcement and other public agencies.

A ‘unique’ opportunity for investors spells mass eviction for tenants

By | July 30th, 2018|Employment & Housing, Intergroup Relations|

Life at The Driftwood apartments was far from perfect. Tenants said the plumbing was prone to leaks and once in a while a cockroach might scamper through the kitchen.

But rent, at $800 or less a month, was doable. And the cream-colored building on Pacific Avenue in Long Beach held special memories.

For Jonaya Chadwick, 19, it

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Behind Trump’s Plan to Overhaul the Government: Scaling Back the Safety Net

By | June 22nd, 2018|Employment & Housing, Intergroup Relations|

WASHINGTON — President Trump, spurred on by conservatives who want him to slash safety net programs, unveiled on Thursday a plan to overhaul the federal government that could have a profound effect on millions of poor and working-class Americans.

Produced over the last year by Mr. Trump’s budget director, Mick Mulvaney, it

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Minimum wage doesn’t cover the rent anywhere in the U.S.

By | June 18th, 2018|Employment & Housing|

A minimum-wage worker would have to put in lots of overtime to be able to afford a modest, two-bedroom apartment anywhere in the country. And downsizing to a one-bedroom pad barely helps.

Even with some states hiking pay for those earning the least, there is still nowhere in the country where a person working a full-time

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Starbucks Closes More Than 8,000 Stores Today For Racial Bias Training Facebook Twitter Flipboard Email

By | May 29th, 2018|Employment & Housing, Intergroup Relations|

A simultaneous training session for 175,000 employees, across more than 8,000 stores — that’s what Starbucks is doing today, urging its workers and managers to discuss racial bias and respect following the arrest of two black men at a Philadelphia store last month.

For the sessions, many Starbucks stores will shut down in the afternoon and

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Why Starbucks’s Bias Training, Despite Skepticism, Is an Important Start

By | May 29th, 2018|Employment & Housing, Intergroup Relations|

Starbucks will temporarily shut 8,000 stores for four hours Tuesday afternoon to conduct racial bias training for its employees. It follows an incident in Philadelphia last month in which two black men were arrested simply for waiting in a store.

What would seem like a positive step forward is already, perhaps predictably,

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Study: Black and Hispanic Students Get Lower Return on Higher Ed Investment

By | May 29th, 2018|Education, Employment & Housing|

Black and Hispanic graduates would have received 1 million more bachelor’s degrees between 2013 and 2015 if the share of their credentials were at parity with their White peers, according to a recent analysis by Center for American Progress.

Black and Hispanic students largely completed associate degrees and certificates, which provide a smaller return on a

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Supreme Court Upholds Workplace Arbitration Contracts Barring Class Actions

By | May 21st, 2018|Employment & Housing|

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court on Monday ruled that companies can use arbitration clauses in employment contracts to prohibit workers from banding together to take legal action over workplace issues.

The vote was 5 to 4, with the court’s more conservative justices in the majority. The court’s

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Why Are New York’s Schools Segregated? It’s Not as Simple as Housing

By | May 2nd, 2018|Education, Employment & Housing|

When asked about school segregation in New York City, Mayor Bill de Blasio has said that schools are segregated because neighborhoods are: “We cannot change the basic reality of housing in New York City.”

Now, as a debate about plans to integrate middle schools has engulfed

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How a Common Interview Question Fuels the Gender Pay Gap (and How to Stop It): Several states and cities have ordered employers to stop asking about salary history.

By | May 1st, 2018|Employment & Housing|

Aileen Rizo was training math teachers in the public schools in Fresno, Calif., when she discovered that her male colleagues with comparable jobs were being paid significantly more.

She was told there was a justifiable reason: Employees’ pay was based on their salaries at previous jobs, and she had been paid less

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