Intergroup Relations

/Intergroup Relations

The ‘OK’ Hand Gesture Is Now Listed As A Symbol Of Hate

By | September 26th, 2019|Hate Crimes, Intergroup Relations|

The “OK” hand gesture, commonly seen as a way of indicating that all is well, has now been classified as something else: a symbol of hate. On Thursday, the Anti-Defamation League, a Jewish civil rights organization, added 36 symbols to its “Hate on Display” database including the index finger-to-thumb sign that in some corners of

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Hate crimes in L.A. County, still on the rise, reach highest point in nearly a decade

By | September 26th, 2019|Hate Crimes, Intergroup Relations|

Despite a slight dip in the overall number of hate crimes reported statewide, the number of such targeted crimes in Los Angeles County increased last year, reaching its highest point in nearly a decade, according to an annual report by the L.A. County Commission on Human Relations.

Black and LGBTQ individuals were those most frequently targeted,

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Train station experiment reveals one way to counteract bias against Muslims

By | August 7th, 2019|Intergroup Relations|

An experiment conducted in German train stations involving paper cups and escaping oranges has found that people are less likely to help a woman if she appears to be Muslim — but they’re more likely to help that same woman if she somehow proves that she shares their social values.

The findings, described in the Proceedings

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AMERICANS NOW BELIEVE WOMEN ARE AS COMPETENT AS MEN—BUT NOT AS AMBITIOUS

By | July 22nd, 2019|Intergroup Relations|

Among Americans, it’s now a widely accepted assumption that women are just as competent and intelligent as men. But men are still seen as more likely to embody the attributes we seek in leaders.

Those are the key findings of a new study that analyzed 62 years of polling data, looking at how attitudes have shifted

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Higher Ed Faces Affirmative Action, Other Equity and Diversity Issues in Courts

By | July 18th, 2019|Education, Intergroup Relations|

As court battles wage over affirmative action, academics with legal expertise see other actual and potential points of litigation that could have a major impact on diversity, equity and inclusion in higher education.

“The smart money is that affirmative action’s days are numbered,” said Justin Driver, the Harry N. Wyatt Professor of Law and the Ludwig

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BIRACIAL AMERICANS FACE UNIQUE STEREOTYPES, ACCORDING TO A NEW STUDY

By | July 16th, 2019|Intergroup Relations, Mixed Race Issues|

The growing number of biracial Americans could, in theory, lead to a less prejudiced society. But new research suggests that these Americans aren’t so much shattering stereotypes as finding themselves pigeonholed with new ones.

“A lot of stereotypes of black-white biracial people were completely different from the ones people have about white people and black people,”

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Hate crimes targeting Jews and Latinos increased in California in 2018, report says

By | July 5th, 2019|Hate Crimes, Intergroup Relations|

Despite a slight decline in the overall number of hate crimes reported statewide, incidents targeting Latinos and Jewish people in California surged last year, an uptick experts have blamed on vitriolic rhetoric over immigration and emboldened hate groups.

Anti-Semitic hate crimes surged 21%. There were 104 hate crimes against Jews reported in 2017. A year later,

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Hispanics with darker skin are more likely to experience discrimination than those with lighter skin

By | July 5th, 2019|Intergroup Relations|

About six-in-ten U.S. Hispanic adults (58%) say they have experienced discrimination or been treated unfairly because of their race or ethnicity, though their experiences vary by skin color, according to a recently released Pew Research Center survey.

About two-thirds of Hispanics with darker skin colors (64%) report they have experienced discrimination or been treated unfairly regularly

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